Pronunciation: ('tur-fās";'tur-fās", in"tur-fās'),
n., v., -faced, -fac•ing.

1. a surface regarded as the common boundary of two bodies, spaces, or phases.
2. the facts, problems, considerations, theories, practices, etc., shared by two or more disciplines, procedures, or fields of study: the interface between chemistry and physics.
3. a common boundary or interconnection between systems, equipment, concepts, or human beings.
4. communication or interaction: Interface between the parent company and its subsidiaries has never been better.
5. a thing or circumstance that enables separate and sometimes incompatible elements to coordinate effectively: The organization serves as an interface between the state government and the public.
6. Computers.
a. equipment or programs designed to communicate information from one system of computing devices or programs to another.
b. any arrangement for such communication.

1. to bring into an interface.
2. to bring together; connect or mesh: The management is interfacing several departments with an information service from overseas.

1. to be in an interface.
2. to function as an interface.
3. to meet or communicate directly; interact, coordinate, synchronize, or harmonize (often fol. by with): The two communications systems are able to interface with each other.

Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Copyright © 1997, by Random House, Inc., on Infoplease.

See also:


Related Content