Pronunciation: (mOOd), [key]
1. a state or quality of feeling at a particular time: What's the boss' mood today?
2. a distinctive emotional quality or character: The mood of the music was almost funereal.
3. a prevailing emotional tone or general attitude: the country's mood.
4. a frame of mind disposed or receptive, as to some activity or thing: I'm not in the mood to see a movie.
5. a state of sullenness, gloom, or bad temper.


Pronunciation: (mOOd), [key]
1. Gram.
a. a set of categories for which the verb is inflected in many languages, and that is typically used to indicate the syntactic relation of the clause in which the verb occurs to other clauses in the sentence, or the attitude of the speaker toward what he or she is saying, as certainty or uncertainty, wish or command, emphasis or hesitancy.
b. a set of syntactic devices in some languages that is similar to this set in function or meaning, involving the use of auxiliary words, as can, may, might.
c. any of the categories of these sets: the Latin indicative, imperative, and subjunctive moods.
2. Logic.a classification of categorical syllogisms by the use of three letters that name, respectively, the major premise, the minor premise, and the conclusion. Also called mode.

Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Copyright © 1997, by Random House, Inc., on Infoplease.

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