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Dictionary


read



Pronunciation: (rēd), [key]
v., readPronunciation: (red), [key] read•ingPronunciation: (rē'ding), [key]
n.


v.t.
1. to look at carefully so as to understand the meaning of (something written, printed, etc.): to read a book; to read music.
2. to utter aloud or render in speech (something written, printed, etc.): reading a story to his children; The actor read his lines in a booming voice.
3. to have such knowledge of (a language) as to be able to understand things written in it: to be able to read French.
4. to apprehend the meaning of (signs, characters, etc.) otherwise than with the eyes, as by means of the fingers: to read Braille.
5. to apprehend or interpret the meaning of (gestures, movements, signals, or the like): to read a semaphore; to read sign language.
6. to make out the significance of by scrutiny or observation: to read the cloudy sky as the threat of a storm; a fisherman skilled in reading a stream for potential pools.
7. to anticipate, expect, or calculate by observation: At the line of scrimmage, the quarterback read a blitz and called an audible.
8. to foresee, foretell, or predict: to read a person's fortune in tea leaves.
9. to make out the character, motivations, desires, etc., of (a person or persons), as by the interpretation of outward signs.
10. to interpret or attribute a meaning to (a written text), a musical composition, etc.): How do you read this clause in the contract?
11. to infer (something not expressed or directly indicated) from what is read, considered, or observed: He read an underlying sarcasm into her letter. In your silence I read agreement to my plan.
12. to adopt or give as a reading in a particular passage: For “one thousand” another version reads “ten thousand.”
13. to substitute or replace (a particular word or phrase) in a written text, usually to correct an error: Read “cavalry” for “calvary.”
14. to check (printers' proofs, copy, etc.) for errors; proofread.
15. to register or indicate, as a thermometer, clock, etc.
16. Computers.to obtain (data, programs, or control information) from an external storage medium or some other source and place in memory.
17. Brit.to study (a subject), as at a university: to read law.
18. to read the work of (an author): She is reading Kafka.
19. to learn by or as if by reading: to read a person's thoughts.
20. to hear and understand (a transmitted radio message or the person transmitting it); receive: I read you loud and clear.
21. to bring, put, etc., by reading: to read oneself to sleep.
22. to give one (a lecture or lesson) by way of admonition or rebuke.
23. to discover or explain the meaning of (a riddle, dream, etc.).

v.i.
1. to read or peruse written or printed matter.
2. to utter aloud or render in speech written or printed words that one is perusing: to read to a person.
3. to give a public reading or recital.
4. to inspect and apprehend the meaning of written or other signs or characters.
5. to occupy oneself seriously with reading or study.
6. to obtain knowledge or learn of something by reading.
7. to admit of being read, esp. properly or well.
8. to have a certain wording.
9. to admit of being interpreted: a rule that reads in two different ways.
10. to register or indicate particular information, as the status or condition of something: Her blood pressure is reading a little low today.
11. to have an effect or make an impression; show forth: Those battle photographs read with great impact.
12. Computers.to read data, programs, or control information.
13. read between the lines. See line 1 (def. 69).
14. read for,(of an actor) to audition for (a role, a play, etc.).
15. read in, Computers.to place (data, programs, or control information) in memory.
16. read lips, to study the lip movements of a speaker who cannot be heard so as to determine the words being uttered.
17. read out,
a. to read aloud, as for someone's attention.
b. Computers.to retrieve (information) from a computer.
18. read out of, to oust from membership in (a political party or other group) by a public announcement of dismissal: He was read out of the association because of alleged subversive activities.
19. read the green. Golf.See green (def. 30).
20. read the riot act. See Riot Act (def. 2).
21. read up on, to learn about by reading; gather information on; research by reading: You'd better read up on World War I before taking the history test.

n.
1. an act or instance of reading: Give the agreement a careful read before you sign it.
2. something that is read: Her new novel is a wonderful read.

read



Pronunciation: (red), [key]
adj.
having knowledge gained by reading (usually used in combination): a well-read person.

Read



Pronunciation: (rēd), [key]
n.
1. George, 1733–98, American political leader: served in the Continental Congress 1774–77.
2. Sir Herbert, 1893–1968, English critic and poet.
3. a male given name: from an Old English word meaning “red.”

Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Copyright © 1997, by Random House, Inc., on Infoplease.

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